greek-museums:

greek-museums:

The temple of Apollo Epicurius, Bassae
Built in a quiet and isolated place within the high and barren mountains of western Arcadia, in Bassae, in an altitude of 1.131 meters, the temple of Apollo Epicurius holds a special place in the history of Greek architecture. The so-called “Parthenon of Peloponnese”, made by Iktinos (420-400 B.C) according to a tradition recorded by Plutarch, is one of the best surviving examples of Classical architecture, combining conservative and innovative features.
The monument combines all three architectural orders of the antiquity and it still preserves some Archaic elements. The temple itself is Doric, while sporting an Ionian frieze. A Corinthian capital, now lost, was also discovered in the first illegal excavations. The missing Corinthian capital is so far the oldest known such find. The splendid Ionian frieze depicting the battle between the Greeks and the Amazons, and the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs is now at the British Museum.
The frieze was discovered in excavations by foreign antiquaries in 1812. After the looting, the frieze and other sculptures were transferred to England (1814). They were subsequently bought at an auction at the behest of the British Prince Regent and in 1815 they were transferred in the British Museum, where they are still exhibited today.
In the beginnings of the 20th century the first restoration attempts began. Restoration was also resumed in the 70’s after a devastating earthquake. From the 80s to the 90s an anti-seismic scaffold was placed along with lightning protection, and the temple was proclaimed a World Cultural Heritage monument by UNESCO- long before any other greek monuments.
Restoration has not been concluded yet, but a new plan for the better protection of the monument from landslides and other natural disasters is being carried out. Restoration work is in particularly difficult in this monument due to the great scattering of its architectural elements. It is essential that all the slabs be identified and placed correctly at their original position.This is a policy that is carried out in every greek restoration and very often restorations utilize methods similar to those that would have been used in the building of these monuments. The use of these methods aim for the greater authenticity in the textural quality of the monument.

*One of the terms used in the reclaiming of Elgin’s marbles from the British Museum, by the Ministry of Culture is that the greek side will give up on any other possible claims from the same museum- such as the Ionian frieze of this temple. However, greek archaeologists have their own agenda and the frieze of Bassae will be definitely officially reclaimed one day.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

greek-museums:

The temple of Apollo Epicurius, Bassae
Built in a quiet and isolated place within the high and barren mountains of western Arcadia, in Bassae, in an altitude of 1.131 meters, the temple of Apollo Epicurius holds a special place in the history of Greek architecture. The so-called “Parthenon of Peloponnese”, made by Iktinos (420-400 B.C) according to a tradition recorded by Plutarch, is one of the best surviving examples of Classical architecture, combining conservative and innovative features.
The monument combines all three architectural orders of the antiquity and it still preserves some Archaic elements. The temple itself is Doric, while sporting an Ionian frieze. A Corinthian capital, now lost, was also discovered in the first illegal excavations. The missing Corinthian capital is so far the oldest known such find. The splendid Ionian frieze depicting the battle between the Greeks and the Amazons, and the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs is now at the British Museum.
The frieze was discovered in excavations by foreign antiquaries in 1812. After the looting, the frieze and other sculptures were transferred to England (1814). They were subsequently bought at an auction at the behest of the British Prince Regent and in 1815 they were transferred in the British Museum, where they are still exhibited today.
In the beginnings of the 20th century the first restoration attempts began. Restoration was also resumed in the 70’s after a devastating earthquake. From the 80s to the 90s an anti-seismic scaffold was placed along with lightning protection, and the temple was proclaimed a World Cultural Heritage monument by UNESCO- long before any other greek monuments.
Restoration has not been concluded yet, but a new plan for the better protection of the monument from landslides and other natural disasters is being carried out. Restoration work is in particularly difficult in this monument due to the great scattering of its architectural elements. It is essential that all the slabs be identified and placed correctly at their original position.This is a policy that is carried out in every greek restoration and very often restorations utilize methods similar to those that would have been used in the building of these monuments. The use of these methods aim for the greater authenticity in the textural quality of the monument.

*One of the terms used in the reclaiming of Elgin’s marbles from the British Museum, by the Ministry of Culture is that the greek side will give up on any other possible claims from the same museum- such as the Ionian frieze of this temple. However, greek archaeologists have their own agenda and the frieze of Bassae will be definitely officially reclaimed one day.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

greek-museums:

The temple of Apollo Epicurius, Bassae
Built in a quiet and isolated place within the high and barren mountains of western Arcadia, in Bassae, in an altitude of 1.131 meters, the temple of Apollo Epicurius holds a special place in the history of Greek architecture. The so-called “Parthenon of Peloponnese”, made by Iktinos (420-400 B.C) according to a tradition recorded by Plutarch, is one of the best surviving examples of Classical architecture, combining conservative and innovative features.
The monument combines all three architectural orders of the antiquity and it still preserves some Archaic elements. The temple itself is Doric, while sporting an Ionian frieze. A Corinthian capital, now lost, was also discovered in the first illegal excavations. The missing Corinthian capital is so far the oldest known such find. The splendid Ionian frieze depicting the battle between the Greeks and the Amazons, and the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs is now at the British Museum.
The frieze was discovered in excavations by foreign antiquaries in 1812. After the looting, the frieze and other sculptures were transferred to England (1814). They were subsequently bought at an auction at the behest of the British Prince Regent and in 1815 they were transferred in the British Museum, where they are still exhibited today.
In the beginnings of the 20th century the first restoration attempts began. Restoration was also resumed in the 70’s after a devastating earthquake. From the 80s to the 90s an anti-seismic scaffold was placed along with lightning protection, and the temple was proclaimed a World Cultural Heritage monument by UNESCO- long before any other greek monuments.
Restoration has not been concluded yet, but a new plan for the better protection of the monument from landslides and other natural disasters is being carried out. Restoration work is in particularly difficult in this monument due to the great scattering of its architectural elements. It is essential that all the slabs be identified and placed correctly at their original position.This is a policy that is carried out in every greek restoration and very often restorations utilize methods similar to those that would have been used in the building of these monuments. The use of these methods aim for the greater authenticity in the textural quality of the monument.

*One of the terms used in the reclaiming of Elgin’s marbles from the British Museum, by the Ministry of Culture is that the greek side will give up on any other possible claims from the same museum- such as the Ionian frieze of this temple. However, greek archaeologists have their own agenda and the frieze of Bassae will be definitely officially reclaimed one day.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

greek-museums:

The temple of Apollo Epicurius, Bassae
Built in a quiet and isolated place within the high and barren mountains of western Arcadia, in Bassae, in an altitude of 1.131 meters, the temple of Apollo Epicurius holds a special place in the history of Greek architecture. The so-called “Parthenon of Peloponnese”, made by Iktinos (420-400 B.C) according to a tradition recorded by Plutarch, is one of the best surviving examples of Classical architecture, combining conservative and innovative features.
The monument combines all three architectural orders of the antiquity and it still preserves some Archaic elements. The temple itself is Doric, while sporting an Ionian frieze. A Corinthian capital, now lost, was also discovered in the first illegal excavations. The missing Corinthian capital is so far the oldest known such find. The splendid Ionian frieze depicting the battle between the Greeks and the Amazons, and the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs is now at the British Museum.
The frieze was discovered in excavations by foreign antiquaries in 1812. After the looting, the frieze and other sculptures were transferred to England (1814). They were subsequently bought at an auction at the behest of the British Prince Regent and in 1815 they were transferred in the British Museum, where they are still exhibited today.
In the beginnings of the 20th century the first restoration attempts began. Restoration was also resumed in the 70’s after a devastating earthquake. From the 80s to the 90s an anti-seismic scaffold was placed along with lightning protection, and the temple was proclaimed a World Cultural Heritage monument by UNESCO- long before any other greek monuments.
Restoration has not been concluded yet, but a new plan for the better protection of the monument from landslides and other natural disasters is being carried out. Restoration work is in particularly difficult in this monument due to the great scattering of its architectural elements. It is essential that all the slabs be identified and placed correctly at their original position.This is a policy that is carried out in every greek restoration and very often restorations utilize methods similar to those that would have been used in the building of these monuments. The use of these methods aim for the greater authenticity in the textural quality of the monument.

*One of the terms used in the reclaiming of Elgin’s marbles from the British Museum, by the Ministry of Culture is that the greek side will give up on any other possible claims from the same museum- such as the Ionian frieze of this temple. However, greek archaeologists have their own agenda and the frieze of Bassae will be definitely officially reclaimed one day.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

greek-museums:

The temple of Apollo Epicurius, Bassae
Built in a quiet and isolated place within the high and barren mountains of western Arcadia, in Bassae, in an altitude of 1.131 meters, the temple of Apollo Epicurius holds a special place in the history of Greek architecture. The so-called “Parthenon of Peloponnese”, made by Iktinos (420-400 B.C) according to a tradition recorded by Plutarch, is one of the best surviving examples of Classical architecture, combining conservative and innovative features.
The monument combines all three architectural orders of the antiquity and it still preserves some Archaic elements. The temple itself is Doric, while sporting an Ionian frieze. A Corinthian capital, now lost, was also discovered in the first illegal excavations. The missing Corinthian capital is so far the oldest known such find. The splendid Ionian frieze depicting the battle between the Greeks and the Amazons, and the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs is now at the British Museum.
The frieze was discovered in excavations by foreign antiquaries in 1812. After the looting, the frieze and other sculptures were transferred to England (1814). They were subsequently bought at an auction at the behest of the British Prince Regent and in 1815 they were transferred in the British Museum, where they are still exhibited today.
In the beginnings of the 20th century the first restoration attempts began. Restoration was also resumed in the 70’s after a devastating earthquake. From the 80s to the 90s an anti-seismic scaffold was placed along with lightning protection, and the temple was proclaimed a World Cultural Heritage monument by UNESCO- long before any other greek monuments.
Restoration has not been concluded yet, but a new plan for the better protection of the monument from landslides and other natural disasters is being carried out. Restoration work is in particularly difficult in this monument due to the great scattering of its architectural elements. It is essential that all the slabs be identified and placed correctly at their original position.This is a policy that is carried out in every greek restoration and very often restorations utilize methods similar to those that would have been used in the building of these monuments. The use of these methods aim for the greater authenticity in the textural quality of the monument.

*One of the terms used in the reclaiming of Elgin’s marbles from the British Museum, by the Ministry of Culture is that the greek side will give up on any other possible claims from the same museum- such as the Ionian frieze of this temple. However, greek archaeologists have their own agenda and the frieze of Bassae will be definitely officially reclaimed one day.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

greek-museums:

The temple of Apollo Epicurius, Bassae
Built in a quiet and isolated place within the high and barren mountains of western Arcadia, in Bassae, in an altitude of 1.131 meters, the temple of Apollo Epicurius holds a special place in the history of Greek architecture. The so-called “Parthenon of Peloponnese”, made by Iktinos (420-400 B.C) according to a tradition recorded by Plutarch, is one of the best surviving examples of Classical architecture, combining conservative and innovative features.
The monument combines all three architectural orders of the antiquity and it still preserves some Archaic elements. The temple itself is Doric, while sporting an Ionian frieze. A Corinthian capital, now lost, was also discovered in the first illegal excavations. The missing Corinthian capital is so far the oldest known such find. The splendid Ionian frieze depicting the battle between the Greeks and the Amazons, and the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs is now at the British Museum.
The frieze was discovered in excavations by foreign antiquaries in 1812. After the looting, the frieze and other sculptures were transferred to England (1814). They were subsequently bought at an auction at the behest of the British Prince Regent and in 1815 they were transferred in the British Museum, where they are still exhibited today.
In the beginnings of the 20th century the first restoration attempts began. Restoration was also resumed in the 70’s after a devastating earthquake. From the 80s to the 90s an anti-seismic scaffold was placed along with lightning protection, and the temple was proclaimed a World Cultural Heritage monument by UNESCO- long before any other greek monuments.
Restoration has not been concluded yet, but a new plan for the better protection of the monument from landslides and other natural disasters is being carried out. Restoration work is in particularly difficult in this monument due to the great scattering of its architectural elements. It is essential that all the slabs be identified and placed correctly at their original position.This is a policy that is carried out in every greek restoration and very often restorations utilize methods similar to those that would have been used in the building of these monuments. The use of these methods aim for the greater authenticity in the textural quality of the monument.

*One of the terms used in the reclaiming of Elgin’s marbles from the British Museum, by the Ministry of Culture is that the greek side will give up on any other possible claims from the same museum- such as the Ionian frieze of this temple. However, greek archaeologists have their own agenda and the frieze of Bassae will be definitely officially reclaimed one day.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

greek-museums:

The temple of Apollo Epicurius, Bassae
Built in a quiet and isolated place within the high and barren mountains of western Arcadia, in Bassae, in an altitude of 1.131 meters, the temple of Apollo Epicurius holds a special place in the history of Greek architecture. The so-called “Parthenon of Peloponnese”, made by Iktinos (420-400 B.C) according to a tradition recorded by Plutarch, is one of the best surviving examples of Classical architecture, combining conservative and innovative features.
The monument combines all three architectural orders of the antiquity and it still preserves some Archaic elements. The temple itself is Doric, while sporting an Ionian frieze. A Corinthian capital, now lost, was also discovered in the first illegal excavations. The missing Corinthian capital is so far the oldest known such find. The splendid Ionian frieze depicting the battle between the Greeks and the Amazons, and the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs is now at the British Museum.
The frieze was discovered in excavations by foreign antiquaries in 1812. After the looting, the frieze and other sculptures were transferred to England (1814). They were subsequently bought at an auction at the behest of the British Prince Regent and in 1815 they were transferred in the British Museum, where they are still exhibited today.
In the beginnings of the 20th century the first restoration attempts began. Restoration was also resumed in the 70’s after a devastating earthquake. From the 80s to the 90s an anti-seismic scaffold was placed along with lightning protection, and the temple was proclaimed a World Cultural Heritage monument by UNESCO- long before any other greek monuments.
Restoration has not been concluded yet, but a new plan for the better protection of the monument from landslides and other natural disasters is being carried out. Restoration work is in particularly difficult in this monument due to the great scattering of its architectural elements. It is essential that all the slabs be identified and placed correctly at their original position.This is a policy that is carried out in every greek restoration and very often restorations utilize methods similar to those that would have been used in the building of these monuments. The use of these methods aim for the greater authenticity in the textural quality of the monument.

*One of the terms used in the reclaiming of Elgin’s marbles from the British Museum, by the Ministry of Culture is that the greek side will give up on any other possible claims from the same museum- such as the Ionian frieze of this temple. However, greek archaeologists have their own agenda and the frieze of Bassae will be definitely officially reclaimed one day.
Zoom Info

greek-museums:

greek-museums:

The temple of Apollo Epicurius, Bassae

Built in a quiet and isolated place within the high and barren mountains of western Arcadia, in Bassae, in an altitude of 1.131 meters, the temple of Apollo Epicurius holds a special place in the history of Greek architecture. The so-called “Parthenon of Peloponnese”, made by Iktinos (420-400 B.C) according to a tradition recorded by Plutarch, is one of the best surviving examples of Classical architecture, combining conservative and innovative features.

The monument combines all three architectural orders of the antiquity and it still preserves some Archaic elements. The temple itself is Doric, while sporting an Ionian frieze. A Corinthian capital, now lost, was also discovered in the first illegal excavations. The missing Corinthian capital is so far the oldest known such find. The splendid Ionian frieze depicting the battle between the Greeks and the Amazons, and the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs is now at the British Museum.

The frieze was discovered in excavations by foreign antiquaries in 1812. After the looting, the frieze and other sculptures were transferred to England (1814). They were subsequently bought at an auction at the behest of the British Prince Regent and in 1815 they were transferred in the British Museum, where they are still exhibited today.

In the beginnings of the 20th century the first restoration attempts began. Restoration was also resumed in the 70’s after a devastating earthquake. From the 80s to the 90s an anti-seismic scaffold was placed along with lightning protection, and the temple was proclaimed a World Cultural Heritage monument by UNESCO- long before any other greek monuments.

Restoration has not been concluded yet, but a new plan for the better protection of the monument from landslides and other natural disasters is being carried out. Restoration work is in particularly difficult in this monument due to the great scattering of its architectural elements. It is essential that all the slabs be identified and placed correctly at their original position.This is a policy that is carried out in every greek restoration and very often restorations utilize methods similar to those that would have been used in the building of these monuments. The use of these methods aim for the greater authenticity in the textural quality of the monument.

*One of the terms used in the reclaiming of Elgin’s marbles from the British Museum, by the Ministry of Culture is that the greek side will give up on any other possible claims from the same museum- such as the Ionian frieze of this temple. However, greek archaeologists have their own agenda and the frieze of Bassae will be definitely officially reclaimed one day.

lionofchaeronea:

The burghers of Ghent surrender to Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, after the Battle of Gavere in 1453.  Unknown Flemish miniaturist, from a manuscript of the 1450s, now in the Austrian National Library, Vienna.

lionofchaeronea:

The burghers of Ghent surrender to Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, after the Battle of Gavere in 1453.  Unknown Flemish miniaturist, from a manuscript of the 1450s, now in the Austrian National Library, Vienna.


…the Saints are displayed in a cathedral in Eastern Germany close to the Czech border and were acquired in the 17th century when there was a big trade in relics. They are said to be the remains of Martyred saints that were stored in the catacombs of Rome before being removed and traded. They were reassembled and dressed in their fine regalia and displayed in ornate cabinets.
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…the Saints are displayed in a cathedral in Eastern Germany close to the Czech border and were acquired in the 17th century when there was a big trade in relics. They are said to be the remains of Martyred saints that were stored in the catacombs of Rome before being removed and traded. They were reassembled and dressed in their fine regalia and displayed in ornate cabinets.
Zoom Info

…the Saints are displayed in a cathedral in Eastern Germany close to the Czech border and were acquired in the 17th century when there was a big trade in relics. They are said to be the remains of Martyred saints that were stored in the catacombs of Rome before being removed and traded. They were reassembled and dressed in their fine regalia and displayed in ornate cabinets.

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.
The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.
Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.
During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C
During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.
Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.
The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.
Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.
During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C
During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.
Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.
The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.
Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.
During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C
During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.
Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.
The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.
Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.
During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C
During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.
Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.
The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.
Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.
During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C
During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.
Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.
The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.
Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.
During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C
During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.
Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.
The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.
Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.
During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C
During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.
Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.
The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.
Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.
During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C
During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.
Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.
Zoom Info
greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.
The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.
Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.
During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C
During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.
Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.
Zoom Info

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Sicyon:

The Sicyon Museum is housed in part of the Roman bathhouse to the north of the Hellenistic and Roman city. It was a public bath that served the needs of the city, but also a place of gathering for citizens to socialize with each other.

The bathhouse of Sicyon, a brick structure that has been preserved in a very good condition over the centuries, with walls surviving for up to 4 meters. It was a characteristic landmark of the area up to the beginnings of the 20th century, known also as “Palaces”. In 1935 Anastasios Orlandos, who excavated Sicyon and uncovered the complex, restored four rooms to house the growing collection of Sicyon.

Ancient Sicyon itself goes very back in time. Prehistoric settlements have also been discovered. These ancient origins are reflected in the local names, such as Aigialeia, from the mythical founder Aigialeus, and Telchinia, from the mythical metal-workers Telchines. The name Mekone which is also prehistoric was owed to the poppy plant which still floods the area in spring. According to ancient tradition the city took its name after the young king Sicyon who moved there from Athens. But Sicyon also means gourd, which are to be found in abundance in the area.

During the so-called “Descent of the Dorians” the area was captured by the newcomers- it had been under the control of Mycenae before. The original population was not expelled from the area and circa 7th century B.C the Orthagorid family rose from their ranks and established a tyrrany in the city. The most important tyrnat was Kleisthenes, who ruled from 590 to 560 B.C

During that time the arts flourished and it was then that the schools for sculpture and large-scale painting emerged. Sicyon sided with Dorian Sparta during the Persian and the Peloponnesian wars. In 396 the city was captured by Theban forces and Euphron of Sicyon had managed to overthrow the oligarchic regime and establish a democracy. Euphron was however murdered in Thebes later. The next prominent figure to meet the same fate was Aratus of Sicyon who had freed the city from the Macedonian rule. He was also murdered in Patrai.

Sicyon became the new administrative center after Corinth’s destruction by the Romans. It shouldered by itself the organization of the Isthmian games up until 87 B.C when it was looted by Sulla and many of the city’s works of art were carried to Rome.

fromgreecetoanarchy:

"Loukanikos" internationally known as the "Riot Dog" passed away today in Athens at the age of 10. His health was adversely affected by police asphyxiating gas and from being kicked from police, forcing him to “retire” from active protest about two years ago. “He was on the couch sleeping, when suddenly his heart stopped beating”.
Farewell our comrade
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBqdWeov8jM
Zoom Info
fromgreecetoanarchy:

"Loukanikos" internationally known as the "Riot Dog" passed away today in Athens at the age of 10. His health was adversely affected by police asphyxiating gas and from being kicked from police, forcing him to “retire” from active protest about two years ago. “He was on the couch sleeping, when suddenly his heart stopped beating”.
Farewell our comrade
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBqdWeov8jM
Zoom Info
fromgreecetoanarchy:

"Loukanikos" internationally known as the "Riot Dog" passed away today in Athens at the age of 10. His health was adversely affected by police asphyxiating gas and from being kicked from police, forcing him to “retire” from active protest about two years ago. “He was on the couch sleeping, when suddenly his heart stopped beating”.
Farewell our comrade
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBqdWeov8jM
Zoom Info
fromgreecetoanarchy:

"Loukanikos" internationally known as the "Riot Dog" passed away today in Athens at the age of 10. His health was adversely affected by police asphyxiating gas and from being kicked from police, forcing him to “retire” from active protest about two years ago. “He was on the couch sleeping, when suddenly his heart stopped beating”.
Farewell our comrade
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBqdWeov8jM
Zoom Info
fromgreecetoanarchy:

"Loukanikos" internationally known as the "Riot Dog" passed away today in Athens at the age of 10. His health was adversely affected by police asphyxiating gas and from being kicked from police, forcing him to “retire” from active protest about two years ago. “He was on the couch sleeping, when suddenly his heart stopped beating”.
Farewell our comrade
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBqdWeov8jM
Zoom Info
fromgreecetoanarchy:

"Loukanikos" internationally known as the "Riot Dog" passed away today in Athens at the age of 10. His health was adversely affected by police asphyxiating gas and from being kicked from police, forcing him to “retire” from active protest about two years ago. “He was on the couch sleeping, when suddenly his heart stopped beating”.
Farewell our comrade
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBqdWeov8jM
Zoom Info
fromgreecetoanarchy:

"Loukanikos" internationally known as the "Riot Dog" passed away today in Athens at the age of 10. His health was adversely affected by police asphyxiating gas and from being kicked from police, forcing him to “retire” from active protest about two years ago. “He was on the couch sleeping, when suddenly his heart stopped beating”.
Farewell our comrade
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBqdWeov8jM
Zoom Info
fromgreecetoanarchy:

"Loukanikos" internationally known as the "Riot Dog" passed away today in Athens at the age of 10. His health was adversely affected by police asphyxiating gas and from being kicked from police, forcing him to “retire” from active protest about two years ago. “He was on the couch sleeping, when suddenly his heart stopped beating”.
Farewell our comrade
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBqdWeov8jM
Zoom Info

fromgreecetoanarchy:

"Loukanikos" internationally known as the "Riot Dog" passed away today in Athens at the age of 10. His health was adversely affected by police asphyxiating gas and from being kicked from police, forcing him to “retire” from active protest about two years ago.

“He was on the couch sleeping, when suddenly his heart stopped beating”.

Farewell our comrade

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBqdWeov8jM